Colorado cartoonist Ed Stein launches web strip ‘Sleeper Ave.’

Colorado cartoonist Ed Stein launches web strip ‘Sleeper Ave.’

Colorado editorial cartoonist Ed Stein is climbing onto the Web today to boldly launch a cartoon series on growing up in Waco, Texas, during the transformative 1950s and 1960s. The series is called Sleeper Ave and appears to be a kind of mash up of “Madmen” and “Road Runner” and “Johnny Test.”

Stein has posted Part I of the series, “The Lord of the Toads,” and is officially launching the project Wednesday.

Readers of the Rocky Mountain News (R.I.P.) will recall Stein’s work. He won a great many awards and in 1997 started drawing “Denver Square,” a daily strip about a fictional family living in Mile High City. The Denver Square series was later published in book form as “Denver Square, We Need a Bigger House.”

Stein is getting paid for Sleeper Ave through crowd funding, one of the emerging independent media funding models news and editorial writers and drawers have turned to in recent years.

Way to go, Ed!

[ Image via Ed Stein of himself in Waco in 1953 on the day a roaring tornado a third of a mile wide leveled the town. Nothing sleepy about that!]

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About the Author

John Tomasic

Writer, editor, teacher, web wrangler. He has worked for art, business, culture, politics publications, five universities and a UN war crimes commission. @johntomasic
jtomasic@coloradoindependent.com | 720-432-2128 |

1 Comment

  1. Harry Doby on said:

    Very touching story. Not much we can do when Nature decides to impress us with her power.

    My memories at about that age was when Hurricane Donna passed over us in Hollywood Florida in 1960. My parents and 4 of my siblings huddled in our one story home as the winds and rain blasted over us. We opened the jalousie windows on the opposite side from the direction of the wind to keep the pressure equalized. As the eye of the hurricane passed directly over us, there was an eerie calm for a few minutes, before the wind started up with a roar in the opposite direction. We rushed to close the windows on one side and open them on the other before the pressure could cause our home to pop like an over-inflated balloon.

    After the storm passed, our streets were flooded, so we wound up being the neighborhood shuttle service with our 1958 Volkswagen Micro Bus that waded successfully through the knee-deep waters.

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