Homebrew: Widow compensated for husband’s oil-patch death

… and other news extracted from around the state.

Homebrew: Widow compensated for husband’s oil-patch death

Don’t inhale

The widow of Jim Freemeyer was awarded full workman’s compensation benefits for his death on a Weld County oil patch last year. He’s one of nine to die from inhaling deadly chemicals while measuring oil levels — prompting the Centers for Disease Control to issue a national warning about “tank gauging” in April. Via The Denver Post.


A Colorado Springs homicide detective was arrested Monday based on information he himself disclosed. As Ellie Mulder reports in The Gazette, officer Paul Patton is suspected of trying to influence a public servant, official misconduct and false reporting.

Excessive force

A Colorado Springs woman filed suit Friday against a police officer for slamming her to the ground at a hospital two years ago. Drunk and underage at the time, she kicked him in the “pelvic region” the officer said, but her attorneys said it was his clipboard that clipped him. Via The Gazette

Conflict of interest

According to a report from Denver’s Board of Ethics, newly elected councilwoman Stacie Gilmore’s marriage to a mayoral appointee in the parks department poses a “significant potential” for conflict of interest. The seven page opinion released Monday states Gilmore is fine to vote on routine policies and contracts — which typically don’t get much discussion or dissent anyway — but advises the councilwoman to “avoid situations that create even the appearance of impropriety.” Via The Denver Post.  

Breaking rank

Sen. Cory Gardner broke from many of his Republican colleagues in voting against a bill that would’ve given states more control of federal public lands. The bipartisan energy bill was stripped of its most contentious amendments, but nonetheless failed to pass the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee 15-7. Via The Durango Herald

Underfunded oversight

Larimer County is falling behind on health and safety inspections of restaurants, reports The Coloradoanbut the problem isn’t unique. The Colorado Legislature hasn’t raised licensing fees since 2009, so there’s just not enough money to get the job done.

Tool on the loose

A young man armed with a hammer stole $11,000 worth of product from a dispensary in Aspen on Tuesday. He fled on foot and is still at large. Via The Aspen Times. 


“Oil Patch Pattern” by John Davey, Creative Commons, via Flickr

Get Wiretap delivered to your inbox every weekday!
Just enter your email address below.

Like this story? Steal it! Feel free to republish it in part or in full, just please give credit to The Colorado Independent and add a link to the original.

Got a tip? Story pitch? Send us an e-mail. Follow The Colorado Independent on Twitter.

About the Author

Nat Stein

Nat Stein is a Denver-based reporter. Check out her other work at Cipher magazine, KRCC public radio, Jacobin magazine and In These Times.

Leave a Response

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>