Wiretap: A Hollywood tragedy, Obama beating Trump and why the two-state solution could expire on inauguration day

Wiretap: A Hollywood tragedy, Obama beating Trump and why the two-state solution could expire on inauguration day

Expiration date

The two-state solution for an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement may have a January 20 expiration date. That’s, of course, when Donald Trump takes office. And when everything could change. Via the New York Times.

20th century politics

David Rothkopf: Obama’s last act of Israeli drama may have been his best. And what he proved was that Trump, Putin and Netanyahu are the last politicians from the 20th century. Via Foreign Policy.

Criticizing Kerry

John Kerry’s speech criticizing Israeli settlements drew warm support in Europe, but not so much in Congress from either party. Via the New York Times.

One last time

It’s no puzzle why Obama felt he had to be heard on Israel one final time, issuing one last warning. But in case you don’t understand, David Remnick explains. Via the New Yorker.

Haters gonna hate

Unsurprisingly, the National Review has a different take on Obama and Israel. You may have heard it before: Obama despises Israel because he despises the West.

Wait your turn

What’s really bugging Trump about Obama, other than the little slights the president sends the president-elect’s way, is as simple as this: Apparently only one person can be president at a time. Via Politico.

Most admired man

Would Obama actually have beaten Trump if Obama could have run for a third term? That’s an unknowable, of course. But there is this: In the Gallup poll, Obama did beat Trump as the country’s most admired man. And, once again, Hillary Clinton was the most admired woman. Via the Washington Post.

Hollywood tragedy

In a tragic story line of the kind that Hollywood made famous, Debbie Reynolds dies a day after her daughter, Carrie Fisher. According to TMZ, Reynolds died of a stroke while planning her daughter’s funeral. For the famous mother burying her famous daughter, it might just as well have been a broken heart. Via the Los Angeles Times.

Psychological breakthrough

Psychologists think they have made a breakthrough in figuring out why people have such trouble changing their minds when it comes to political beliefs: It all comes down to partisan identity. Via Vox.

Photo credit: Gage Skidmore, Creative Commons, Flickr. 

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About the Author

Mike Littwin

He has covered Dr. J, four presidential inaugurations, six national conventions and countless brain-numbing speeches in the New Hampshire and Iowa snow.
mlittwin@coloradoindependent.com | Twitter @mike_littwin

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