The Home Front: CU chancellor suspended for handling of domestic violence allegations against an ex-football coach

Your morning roundup of stories from the front pages of newspapers across Colorado.

The Home Front: CU chancellor suspended for handling of domestic violence allegations against an ex-football coach

“University of Colorado Chancellor Phil DiStefano will receive a 10-day suspension in the wake of an investigation into the university’s handling of domestic violence allegations against former University of Colorado football assistant coach Joe Tumpkin,” reports The Boulder Daily Camera. “The Board of Regents announced the suspension on Monday afternoon during an intense board meeting and subsequent news conference. Before the news conference began, regents fled the room, evading reporters’ questions. Ken Salazar, the Democratic ex-senator and former interior secretary who was retained by the board, presented a summary of a report of the investigation that was released after the meeting. CU hired outside legal counsel from the firm Cozen O’Connor to investigate the university’s handling of the domestic violence allegations.”

“The Longmont Housing Authority has authorized its own inquiry into allegations that several tenants’ constitutional rights to privacy were violated when police with K-9 dogs entered apartments without tenants being told of their right to refuse warrantless police entry,” reports The Longmont Times-Call. “In a Monday announcement posted on the Longmont Housing Authority’s website, David Herrera, the housing agency board’s attorney, wrote that the board ‘has authorized me to undertake an internal inquiry into both the law and facts involved in the general and specific allegations of potential intrusion into privacy rights and unlawful searches of private dwellings.'”

“Greeley-Evans School District 6 School Board on Monday unanimously approved a $228 million budget for next school year,” reports The Greeley Tribune. “In the shadow of last year’s failed mill levy override attempt — with an all-but-official second attempt planned for this year’s election — District 6 officials had to balance a number of priorities, wants and challenges in this budget.”

“The Loveland Planning Commission on Monday checked a box on the list of steps required to place a question on November’s ballot asking downtown voters to approve debt for the Downtown Development Authority,” reports The Loveland Reporter-Herald. “For the third time in as many years, the DDA board is planning to go to downtown voters with a funding question, and state law requires the Planning Commission to approve a recommendation to the City Council, according to city economic development manager Mike Scholl, who made a presentation at Monday evening’s commission meeting.”

“Swift-water rescue teams from Roaring Fork Valley fire departments responded to two incidents Monday — and now things are about to get really interesting,” reports The Glenwood Springs Post-Independent. “The Twin Lakes Canal Co. will end diversions to the East Slope and increase releases into the Roaring Fork River starting tonight. About 625 cubic feet per second that is typically diverted to Twin Lakes at this time of year will be released into the Roaring Fork River.”

“U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke recommended Monday that President Donald Trump reverse his predecessor and reduce the size of Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah,” reports The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel. “In an interim report that Trump ordered to review Antiquities Act designations since 1996, Zinke said the 1.3 million acres set aside for the monument before Obama left office last year needs to be “right-sized.” “There is no doubt that it is drop-dead gorgeous country and that it merits some degree of protection, but designating a monument that, including state land, encompasses almost 1.5 million acres where multiple-use management is hindered or prohibited is not the best use of the land and is not in accordance with the intention of the Antiquities Act,” Zinke said in a statement.”

“Marilyn Fox found a new way of life and new friends after opening her home to vacation renters three years ago,” reports The Coloradoan in Fort Collins. “Now she hopes to make what she does legal. “I just want to make this right,” she said. “I’ll pay back taxes or do whatever it takes. I just want to run my Airbnb.” Fox is among several property owners in Fort Collins struggling to comply with the city’s new regulations for short-term rentals, or STRs.”

“With rising temperatures, this year’s snowpack is melting and causing the level of the Arkansas River to also rise,” reports The Cañon City Daily Record. “On Monday, the Arkansas River in the areas of Cañon City and Parkdale was measured at about 3,770 cubic feet per second. Co-owner of Raft Masters Will Colon said one cubic foot is about the size of a basketball. He said 3,770 basketballs set up in a straight line would be equivalent to the amount of water that is flowing by per second.”

“The first Amazon robots are moving into Thornton by August 2018 as part of the Seattle retailer’s expansion in Colorado,” reports The Denver Post. “The company said Monday it will open its third facility in Colorado and hire 1,500 full-time workers. The new warehouse, a three-story 855,000-square-foot fulfillment center at the northeast corner of Interstate 25 and East 144th Avenue, will handle smaller items such as books, electronics and toys. This will speed up delivery for customers but, according to a spokeswoman, does not mean Denver-area shoppers are any closer to two-hour delivery as part of Amazon Prime Now.”

“The Colorado Springs job market – already boasting a record-low unemployment rate – ranks third in the nation, behind Grand Rapids, Mich., and Raleigh, N.C., and tied with Charlotte, N.C., reports staffing giant ManpowerGroup,” reports The Gazette in Colorado Springs. “Manpower defines the best as those with the biggest difference between the percentage of local employers planning to hire and those anticipating cuts. That ‘net employment outlook’ is projected at 31 percent for Colorado Springs in the July-to-September quarter, with 33 percent of employers surveyed expecting to hire and 2 percent planning layoffs. The rest anticipated no changes or were unsure.”

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About the Author

Corey Hutchins

is a journalist in Colorado, and Columbia Journalism Review's Rocky Mountain correspondent for the United States Project. Follow him on Twitter @CoreyHutchins and email him at CoreyHutchins [at] gmail [dot] com.

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