Wiretap: China devalues its currency and markets go wacky

Another hit

China devalues its currency again. The markets go slightly crazy. No one is exactly sure what it means, but the markets worry that it could mean that China’s economic problems are worse than anyone knew. Via The New York Times.

China’s impact

OK, so it’s a pretty big deal if you’re already rich and you have a lot of money in the stock market, but what does China’s move mean to the rest of us? Via NPR.

Ball pit

How to stop the California drought? Try 96 million plastic balls to block UV rays, curb algae and keep the water clean to drink, reports The New York Times.

Will to trump

George Will is very, very upset by this whole Trump thing. He says it’s time Republicans stand up to the Donald the way that William F. Buckley stood up to the John Birch Society back in the day. Via The Washington Post.

Big headache

Donald Trump says listening to Carly Fiorina gives him a “massive headache.” Fiorina can only hope that that is true. Via The New York Times.

Avoiding war

If you can’t get enough of the Roger Ailes-Donald Trump story, CNN has the inside scoop on how war between the two was averted.

Clinton trips

The Hillary Clinton scandals: a primer, from Whitewater to Benghazi. Via The National Journal.

Stop worrying

Freaking out about Clinton’s campaign so far? The Clinton camp wrote a memo to its top backers telling them to stop worrying. Vox has the memo.

Witness this

How Jehovah’s Witnesses are changing medicine. Yes, Jehovah’s Witnesses. Via The New Yorker.

Deflategate

Deflategate has its (first) day in court. Not much was resolved, but the entertainment value was everything you could hope for. Via The Washington Post.

 

Photo credit: Jason Wesley Upton, Creative Commons, Flickr.

 

The Colorado Independent is a statewide online news source operating in a time when spin is plentiful, but factual, fair and unflinching news in the public interest is all too rare. Our award-winning team of veteran investigative and explanatory reporters and news columnists aims to amplify the voices of Coloradans whose stories are unheard, shine light on the relationships between people, power and policy, and hold public officials to account. We strive to report the news with context, social conscience, and soul, and to give Coloradans the insight they need to promote conversation, understanding and progress in this square, swing state we call home.

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