U.S. House votes to remove ERA obstacle

Colorado's delegation splits along party lines

Devon Hartsough (2nd R) and Keyanna Wigglesworth (R) of the Alice Paul Institute join members of Congress and representatives of women's groups for a rally to mark the 40th anniversary of congressional passage of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) outside the U.S. Capitol March 22, 2012 in Washington, DC. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) and Sen. Robert Menendez (D-NJ) introduced a new version of the Equal Rights Amendment last year and called for it to be passed again. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Devon Hartsough (2nd R) and Keyanna Wigglesworth (R) of the Alice Paul Institute join members of Congress and representatives of women's groups for a rally to mark the 40th anniversary of congressional passage of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) outside the U.S. Capitol March 22, 2012 in Washington, DC. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) and Sen. Robert Menendez (D-NJ) introduced a new version of the Equal Rights Amendment last year and called for it to be passed again. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON — The U.S. House voted on Thursday to remove one barrier to adding the Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, but plenty of legal and political obstacles remain. 

1 COMMENT

  1. If the Democrats are successful with a wave election this year, perhaps the resulting majorities could re-introduce the ERA, and it could be ratified for the centennial of the Equal Rights Amendment introduced in Congress in 1923

    At the very least, it would put current day politicians firmly on record for a position on the equality of women.

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