Colorado’s LGBTQ community says SCOTUS ruling is a step forward, but there’s still more work to do

A demonstrator raises a rainbow colored flag while passing the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception on Colfax Avenue during the Pride Liberation March in coordination with Black Lives Matter 5280 in Denver, June 14, 2020.
A demonstrator raises a rainbow colored flag while passing the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception on Colfax Avenue during the Pride Liberation March in coordination with Black Lives Matter 5280 in Denver, June 14, 2020. (Photo Credit: Kevin Mohatt/For CPR News)

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBTQ employees from workplace discrimination.

In Colorado, the federal decision does not change much. The state already has the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Act (CADA) that was amended to include more protections for LGBTQ people in 2008.

“If anything, the case reaffirms the rights given to Coloradans under CADA,” said Ryann Peyton, a lawyer and board member for The Center on Colfax. “The benefit is that it extends those rights to a federal level as well.”

Read more of the story on CPR News.

Taylor Allen is a Max Wycisk News Fellow. Education: Bachelor’s degree with a dual major of Journalism and Political Science at Temple University. Professional background: Before coming to Colorado Public Radio in 2019, she was digital producer and reporter for WHYY News in Philadelphia. Before that, she was the Philadelphia City Hall correspondent for The PLS Reporter. She’s an NPR Next Generation alumna and a former contributor to Praise 107.9’s “Your Voice” with Solomon Jones. She has experience covering general assignment, community, and public policy stories.

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