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Lafayette City Council kills “civil disobedience” clause of Climate Bill of...

Lafayette City Council last night voted against the “civil disobedience” clause in its community Climate Bill of Rights, the most contentious piece of a...

Lafayette’s Climate Change Bill of Rights: A small town grapples with...

The absence of three of its seven members Tuesday evening prompted the Lafayette City Council to postpone its vote on a controversial proposed Climate...

TIMELINE: The long road to a dedicated fund for affordable housing

If you’ve paid attention to City Council, socialized with developers, or paid rent in Denver over the past year, you know that housing is...

Hancock’s affordable housing plan goes for council vote, despite many doubts

Denver City Council will cast its first vote this evening on a proposed plan to ease the city’s housing crisis. As the local economy...

Denver City Council may proclaim today “Indigenous Peoples’ Day”

The United States shouldn't celebrate a guy who led a genocide against Native Americans. We should celebrate indigenous people instead. So goes the anti-Columbus Day...

A symbolic fight: Jefferson Park scrape-off emblematic of Denver’s growth debate

The two-story Victorian on Eliot St. won’t soon be featured in the Parade of Homes. Foliage conceals much of its modest brick façade from...

Sit on the curb, go to jail

Sit in the wrong place in downtown Colorado Springs, and you could find yourself arrested. At least, that would be the case if Mayor...

The unusual candidacy of Kayvan Khalatbari

It’s a typical setup for a city council forum – the plastic card tables, stackable chairs, lukewarm coffee and trays of supermarket cookies and...

Denver council candidate apologizes for breaking campaign finance rules

Wayne New got some bad news today. As The Colorado Independent reported earlier, Colorado Ethics Watch filed a complaint with the Denver Elections Division...

Durango City Council Forbids Photos of Public Documents

By and large, Durango’s new policy to charge 25 cents per page after the first ten pages of copied public records, and to charge an hourly fee of $30 for document research exceeding 15 minutes, is neither unusual, nor outside Colorado Law Regarding Public Records. The hiccup comes near the bottom of the policy’s discussion of “Fees and Charges,” which reads simply, “Photographing of public records will not be allowed.”